Understanding Employee Benefits and key developments in the employee benefits field and items of interest to our clients. MORE

I recently blogged about an employer who continued health insurance coverage for an employee on short term disability in contravention of the health plan document. The employer lost its stop-loss coverage for health claims incurred by the disabled employee because the health plan document did not specifically allow for continued coverage during disability. Today’s blog

A recent Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals decision considered whether a third party administrator of a self-funded medical plan was a fiduciary under ERISA. Under ERISA, fiduciaries owe strict duties of loyalty and prudence to plan participants and beneficiaries and can be personally liable for losses if they are not. Many third party administrators of

A recent Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals case considered a situation that we have seen in our practice: An employee gets sick, goes out on FMLA leave, and then is placed on short term disability. The employer’s health plan provides that employees are eligible for the plan if they are regularly scheduled to work at

Sole proprietors, partners (including LLC members) and two percent shareholders in an S corporation are not treated as “employees” for purposes of certain benefits. Among those benefits is employer provided health insurance coverage. While employer subsidies for health coverage are generally excluded from the income of employees, that is not the case for sole proprietors,

The Department of Labor recently updated its self-compliance tool for plan sponsors and plan administrators of group health plans. The self-compliance tool contains questions relating to requirements on issues such as limitations on preexisting conditions, certificates of creditable coverage, special enrollment rights, HIPAA nondiscrimination rules, wellness programs, Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, Newborns’

Last Thursday, June 28, in a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court found that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (the “Affordable Care Act” or “Act”) is constitutional paving the way for final implementation of its provisions. http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/11pdf/11-393c3a2.pdf While the Administration argued that the Act was a reasonable use of federal government